Chambers operates an equal opportunities and non-discrimination policy. We do not discriminate directly or indirectly against anyone on the grounds of race, colour, nationality, ethnic origin or citizenships, gender, marital status, sexual orientation, religion, age, political persuasion, or disability. This policy is applied in the provision of services, and in the selection, recruitment and treatment of staff, pupils and tenants.

Data Collection

Members of Chambers, pupils and staff are invited, if they wish, to provide their diversity data as part of Chambers' data diversity policy and pursuant to the Bar Standard Board Handbook. As required, we publish an anonymous summary of available diversity data. The purpose of this is to promote transparency in recruitment and employment activities and an independent, strong, diverse and effective legal profession.


Summary of Data

 The most recent data collection was undertaken in March 2020. All members of the workforce were asked to provide data voluntarily. Approximately 41% of the workforce provided data. The summary below is not a complete analysis of the entire workforce at College Chambers and the statistics below are based on data provided and is not a complete picture of the entire workforce. Certain information that would identify a person has not been utilised for the purposes of anonymity.


Of the total responses 64% were women and 36% were men.


Barristers (including pupils)

  • 67% were women and 33% were male.
  • 100% were white.
  • All were between the ages of 16 and 64.
  •  0% regarded themselves as having a disability within the definition in the Equality Act or whose day-to-day activities are limited a lot or a little because of a health problem or disability which has lasted, or expected to last, at least 12 months
  • 67% were part of the first generation of their family to attend university (33% were not the first generation of their family to attend university
  • 50% primarily attended a UK fee-paying/independent school between the ages of 11-18, and 50% primarily attended a UK state school between the ages of 11-18.
  • 33% were primary carer for child(ren) under the age of 18, 67% were not primary carers for children.
  • 0% provided care to others on account of old age, health or disability.

Staff including clerks

  • 60% were female and 40% were male.
  • 100% were white.
  • All were between the ages of 25 and 64.
  • 0% regarded themselves as having a disability within the definition in the Equality Act or whose day-to-day activities are limited a lot or a little because of a health problem or disability which has lasted, or expected to last, at least 12 months
  • 10% were part of the first generation of their family to attend university; 10% were not part of the first generation of their family to attend university; 20% responded not applicable; 10% withheld.
  • 10% primarily attended a UK fee-paying/independent school between the ages of 11-18, 30% primarily attended a UK state school between the ages of 11-18, and 10% attended a school outside of the UK.
  • 40% were primary carer for child(ren) under the age of 18, 60% were not primary carers for children.
  • 10% provided care to others on account of old age, health or disability

The diversity of Chambers will be regularly reviewed and updated in accordance with the provisions of the said Code.